New 2018 School Uniform Fashion Trends for Boys and Girls

Cookie’s Kids Looks at Events Such as the 2018 Pratt Fashion Show When Analyzing School Uniform Trends This year’s student-driven fashion event exudes sense of “urgency and responsibility” to do something transformative about global climate change crisis.

New York, United States - May 15, 2018 /PressCable/ —

Cookie’s Kids, the world’s largest kids department store chain featuring everything from premium school uniforms and fashion brands to infant items and toys for all ages, has been once again busy analyzing school uniform trends by way of events like the 2018 Pratt Fashion Show, the Pratt Institute’s annual student fashion event wherein young talent gets to present collections to some of the industry’s most prominent figures. While this year’s show did much of the same, according to Cookie’s representatives, there was one notable difference that may in fact alter the course of modern school uniform trends – a sense of “urgency and responsibility” for the young designers, as well as spectators of the show, to come up with a responsible solution to the global climate change crisis.

In addition to a plethora of premium girls and boys clothing and school uniforms, Cookie’s also offers baby clothing, infant clothes, shoes and accessories. You can find more information here: https://www.cookieskids.com/school_uniforms.aspx

The Pratt Institute’s 119th show, dubbed “Fashion Diversiform,” highlighted work from 20 students due to graduate from the country’s oldest fashion program, and also honored designer Gabriela Hearst. Editor-in-chief of Harper’s Bazaar Glenda Bailey presented Hearst with the 2018 Pratt Fashion Visionary Award, an honor last year bestowed upon none other than the creative duo behind Oscar de la Renta.

With regard to the students’ work in this year’s show, Cookie’s reps noted that each collection’s theme touched upon various social statements including immigration, political polarization and female empowerment. Some of the most memorable moments were demonstrated through the use of unconventional materials – or, at least, say Cookie’s reps, unconventional for fashion; these included duct tape, trash bags and burlap sacks.

“Fashion reflects what’s going on in our society, and when we looked to the runway of this year’s Pratt Fashion Show, we saw such distinct trends – a need for simplicity, conversation, sustainability and wanting things that feel personal and special, unlike anything else,” concludes a Cookie’s spokesperson.

Contact Info:
Name: Al Falack
Organization: Cookie's Kids
Address: 510 Fulton Street, Brooklyn, NY, New York 11201, United States
Phone: +1-718-710-4577

For more information, please visit http://www.cookieskids.com

Source: PressCable

Release ID: 344586

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