In posthumous message, Hawking says science under threat

FILE - In this Wednesday Aug. 29, 2012 file photo, British physicist Professor Stephen Hawking speaks during the Opening Ceremony for the 2012 Paralympics in London, Wednesday Aug. 29, 2012. Stephen Hawking has spoken from beyond the grave to warn that science and education are under threat around the world. The words of the scientist, who died in March at 76, were broadcast Monday Oct. 15, 2018 at a London launch event for his final book, "Brief Answers To The Big Questions." (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, file)

Stephen Hawking has spoken from beyond the grave to warn that science and education are under threat around the world

LONDON β€” Stephen Hawking spoke from beyond the grave Monday to warn the world that science and education are under threat around the world.

The words of the scientist, who died in March at 76, were broadcast at a London launch event for his final book "Brief Answers To The Big Questions."

Hawking warned that education and science are "in danger now more than ever before." He cited the election of U.S. President Donald Trump and Britain's 2016 vote to leave the European Union as part of "a global revolt against experts and that includes scientists."

Acknowledging that science had yet to overcome major challenges for the world β€” including climate change, overpopulation, species extinction, deforestation and the degradation of the oceans β€” the physicist still urged young people "to look up at the stars and not down at your feet."

"Try to make sense of what you see, and wonder about what makes the universe exist," he said. "It matters that you don't give up. Unleash your imagination. Shape the future."

Hawking lived for more than five decades with motor neuron disease that left him paralyzed, communicating through a voice-generating computer. In June, his ashes were buried in Westminster Abbey, between the graves of Charles Darwin and Isaac Newton.

Hawking's daughter Lucy, who attended the book launch, said hearing her father's unmistakable voice had been "very emotional."

"I turned away, because I had tears forming in my eyes," she said. "I feel sometimes like he's still here because we talk about him and we hear his voice and we see images of him, and then we have the reminder that he's left us."

Related News

Apple boss Tim Cook optimistic about UK's future...

Feb 9, 2017

Apple CEO Tim Cook says the company the technology giant is committed to Britain's future outside...

Apple's Tim Cook: Fake news is 'killing people's...

Feb 11, 2017

Apple chief executive Tim Cook says fake news is "killing minds," and governments and tech firms...

Yahoo issues another warning in fallout from...

Feb 15, 2017

Yahoo is warning users of potentially malicious activity on their accounts between 2015 and 2016

Epic 'Planet Earth II' offers creatures'-eye view...

Feb 16, 2017

From jungles to deserts to mountains, the BBC's epic nature series "Planet Earth II" takes viewers...

Uber to investigate sexual harassment claim by...

Feb 20, 2017

Uber's CEO has ordered an investigation into a sexual harassment claim made by a female engineer...

The dirty dozen: UN issues list of 12 most...

Feb 27, 2017

The World Health Organization has issued a list of the top dozen bacteria most dangerous to humans,...

Sign up now!